Pages

Tuesday, February 2, 2010

For blogs that are no longer updated

If you no longer update your blog, but it is still configured to publish via FTP, then you received an e-mail from us today announcing the FTP shut-down. If you don't intend to update your blog, then you don't have to do anything. You won't have the ability to update the blog from within Blogger, but if you don't intend to publish new content to the blog, the HTML files will remain intact on your server and your existing posts will continue to function just fine.

If, on the other hand, you intend to update the blog down the road, you will be able to use our migration tool to convert your FTP blog to a Blogger-hosted blog (either at your own domain or at Blogspot), and you can then update the blog at a later date.

68 comments:

  1. Oh boy. Being an early user of Pyra-now-Google's Blogger Blog/FTP service. (In fact, for a month or two in 2001/2 I paid fees to use the service.)

    I have about 100 blogs currently using this open platform.

    Due to the complexity of the situation I find myself, can you guide me to a person/contact to learn how to best migrate, eliminate and/or fix the issue for my clients? We only have one month to change the world...

    seanrox
    678.522.0369

    ReplyDelete
  2. Wow, wow, wow. Seriously? Screw this, I am done with blogger, and gonna move everything to wordpress. What a kick in the face to long time users. Seriously, an effing joke.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Welcome to my blog:http://lionelll.blogspot.com/

    ReplyDelete
  4. I understand that Google's systems are distributed but can BlogSpot withstand a site being "slashdotted" in other words a very large amount of traffic driven to a site?

    What about hosting regular files such as a PDF document? I like to be able to give links such as http://domain.com/file.pdf. Is there going to be a method to handle this?

    ReplyDelete
  5. I started my blog about 2 months ago and had no idea I was publishing via FTP. My URL is blogspot.com yet I still got the email that I had to migrate. Do I really need?

    ReplyDelete
  6. @Stephen We handle hundreds of millions of pageviews per day. Getting Slashdotted, Dugg or any other influx of traffic is well below regular traffic levels for us and will not be an issue.

    @Jane You might be an admin or contributor on a blog that publishes via FTP? If you have a blogspot.com URL you have no need to update.

    ReplyDelete
  7. "critical infrastructure that our FTP support relies on at Google will soon become unavailable". Yeah, Google has trouble supporting a protocol that--yes, still--makes the Internet tick. As Eric Cartman would say, "are you totally seriously?" Glad I've been using Wordpress with clients for the past year...

    ReplyDelete
  8. @Rick, I figured that was the case.

    What about hosting files that are not images on the domain. I prefer not to have to use a sub-domain for my blog but do have some PDF documents and whatnot that I would like available using a standard URL and not posting them on Google Docs and having to provide a cryptic URL to the file on my site.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Well, that's convenient. Thanks for the notice of a couple weeks. I publish via FTP for one reason: Google doesn't support PHP. My Blogger templates are all PHP code that consume the XML from Blogger and generate context aware content and such. Fabulous. Now I get to either live with static HTML garbage or install some hideous CMS system. Thanks much. Makes me nervous about all the money I've been shoveling into Google Apps. One day the color red will be missing from all of my documents.

    ReplyDelete
  10. If I move my blog, will I be stuck with the 'search' toolbar showing up at the top of my blog?

    ReplyDelete
  11. @David, hmcnally: As we noted last year, much of the difficulty relating to FTP is not Google-specific. As we upgrade our infrastructure, the current setup for supporting FTP (Blogger is unique among Google products in using FTP) is going away. Rather than rewrite all of the code relating to FTP to support a very small # of users (when we'd still be subject to the external problems noted above), we made the very difficult decision to turn this part of Blogger off.

    @Heather From the FAQ: you can remove the navbar.

    ReplyDelete
  12. If you're really "committed to making the transition as seamless as possible" then YOU NEED TO WAKE UP AND FIX THE BLOODY EXPORT TOOL!

    http://www.google.com/support/forum/p/blogger/thread?tid=106b7060ffff1c8f

    ReplyDelete
  13. i'm sorry to hear of this change, i got "got the memo" today so glad i read it (!) though i am still a bit confused. i do realize now that old posts on our own server can remain forever though i also recall of late some uploaded images to blogger (eg via email posting) are hosted on blogger so what happens to them?

    fortunately we already using google domains for our email but not the web hosting part as we do server side hoohah and so that can't change. it seems to be the M.O. to start a new subdomain hosted on google domains and then run some other new blog tool from there, is this correct? any way to preview/try out these blog tools?

    this really hurts because we have things already twittering and facebooking from the blog and feeds too. so seems we really have to go back to square 1. though we can't complain as you've been providing us this amazing blogging service for free for how many years now? thanks blogger-google people.

    i could really use some help figuring out this new stuff because i don't want to break anything. i think i can just leave the old blog as static and then just carve out some new blog. wordpress is just too scary for me. the ease of blogger was what always worked for me, i feel like such an old lady now whose cat just died lol.

    ReplyDelete
  14. This is pretty intense guys. I'd gladly pay for this service. How can we make this happen?

    ReplyDelete
  15. @Rick - if I already have an independent web hosting service and my own domain name, will I still be able to use the migration tool? Will I have to change my blog template, too? It runs some javascripts.

    ReplyDelete
  16. I just got the email, and frankly, I'm terrified. My questions:

    #1: My blog is currently hosted in a subdomain of my site: blog.fatfreevegan.com. When I change to a custom domain, can I continue to use that same subdomain or will I have to specify another one? What about the other files (such as images and simple html files) I have stored in that subdomain?

    #2: My blog uses a highly customized template (no widgets/layout). Will that be affected by a change to a custom domain?

    ReplyDelete
  17. I just read your email and am very disappointed at this information. I have to work a lot for this migration. The leading time, less than 2 months, is too short for all of us. Can you give us more leading time for transiotion of our blog pages.

    ReplyDelete
  18. @SusanV This how its gonna be.
    Your blogger url exp: susanV.blogspot.com
    Using this google redirecting service.
    (Settings->publishing->Custom Domain->Already own a domain? Switch to advanced settings)

    You can redirect your custom domain to google's Url. SusanV.com/blog will redirect to SusanV.blogspot.com

    That's their plan.. . Hope that helps

    ReplyDelete
  19. I too have some questions:

    1) Like SusanV, my blog is in a subdomain, will I be able to use that?

    2) Like other questioned before, will I be able to host files other than images/html ?

    3) I have a custom edited template, with javascript that allows me to post code snippets and color highlight them. Will I be able to customize the templates as much?

    4) Will an export tool be provided so that those who don't want to keep using Blogger can transport their blogs to other platforms?

    thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Clarifying: Blogger Custom Domains are not *.blogspot.com. My blog is hosted by Blogger at tins.rklau.com.

    For @LKRaider, @Wendy: You can use a subdomain as a Blogger Custom Domain. You'll need to use our "Missing Files Host" option for files you currently host there, which I'll describe in more detail in a blog post later today or tomorrow. (In the meantime, the help file outlining it is here.)

    @LKRaider - Your custom template will work when hosted by Blogger. And yes, as we've noted in the FAQ and elsewhere, we not only provide you an export file today, we also support converting that into an import format for other platforms.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Rick Klau,

    Like Seanrox, I am a Pyra legacy customer that originally paid for the ftp feature.

    Considering the years of time I've invested creating content for my site (and the fact that the site includes an e-commerce component), I am at a loss concerning what to do. Becoming a sub-domain of Google or blogspot.com is not an option.

    Please call me so I can determine the best course of action. This blog is my life.

    By the way, 2 months notice is not cool.

    Larry 504-931-8569

    ReplyDelete
  22. Thanks for the heads up.

    I migrated to WordPress several years ago, but still have the old static HTML files on my webserver. I am glad to hear that this change will not break them.

    ReplyDelete
  23. About 5 years ago I moved michaelkpate.blogspot.com to incre.dulo.us and then pretty much let it sit. Today, I moved it back.

    As someone who has benefited from the largess of both Google and Blogger over the years I am not going to complain. Even with the best of intentions, things change over the years. I am just glad that is still mostly intact, something that wasn't always a given.

    ReplyDelete
  24. @Web You aren't becoming a subdomain of Google. You can point any domain/subdomain at our nameservers, so that your domain is what users see, which just happens to be hosted by us. (My blog is at tins.rklau.com, instead of rklau.blogspot.com, for instance.)

    ReplyDelete
  25. @Rick, do you think Google Sites will be integrated so static files can be served up with our blog posts? I'm aware that static pages are able to be used but I would like to be able to have a repository that uses "normal" URLs.

    Guess I could host a sub-domain just for that purpose.

    ReplyDelete
  26. One of the biggest downsides of migrating is that while Blogger will update all the post URLs, if you or anyone else linked to a specific post in the body of a post, they will be sent to the home page of the blog rather than the actual post (e.g. if you say in one post that "in my previous post at www.domain.com/previous-post.html, please read the background story,' when a reader clicks on the link they will not end up on subdomain.domain.com/previous-post.html but rather on subdomain.domain.com). What that means is that the reader now will not be able to reach that specific post.

    This can mean lost visitors and ad revenue and that is why the best solution will be to simply not migrate (Blogger says that already published post will work fine forever) and start a new blog at a subdomain.

    ReplyDelete
  27. @eCreative Media: That is not how the migration tool will work. Using rel=canonical and meta refresh will absolutely redirect traffic from blog.com/2009/09/post.html to new.blog.com/2009/09/post.html.

    ReplyDelete
  28. I run a blog that FTPs to a subdirectory of a custom URL: http://terrania.us/journal/

    (In fact, I have several such blogs, though a number of them aren't updated regularly anymore.)

    Your migration service talks about migrating to "a custom URL", as if I wanted to have a "www.myblogname.com" domain, but not a subdirectory of a custom URL where I host my other webpages. Is your migration service going to work for me?

    I update this blog via Windows Live Writer these days. Is my ability to do that going to be affected?

    ReplyDelete
  29. I just noticed that the migration tool will not allow a sub-path, and since my blog is at lkraider.eipper.com.br/blog , using blog.lkraider.eipper.com.br is just awful...

    I would be interested in a tool that would allow me to keep running my blog on my host, some kind of an admin interface just to edit/post new content, and then run completely detached from Blogger (an opensource blogger control panel of sorts).

    I don't have a need for the new Blogger features, and I would like to keep the data at my host for several reasons. Would you please consider releasing such a script?

    ReplyDelete
  30. @Chris You will be able to continue to use Live Writer. You cannot publish to a subdirectory, but can publish to a subdomain.

    @LKRaider While I would love to promise such a script, it's well outside of the realm of possibility given how we are built.

    ReplyDelete
  31. Giving people less than 2 months notice is amazingly short notice. I'm forced to move my blog or find some other approach, within an impossible small amount of time. Shame on you Google.

    Given the effort involved, I plan to move to a real blogging platform such as Wordpress.

    ReplyDelete
  32. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  33. Hi Rick


    "# If I redirect to *.blogspot.com, am I stuck on Blogspot forever?

    * No. You can always update your blog to a Custom Domain, and we will redirect your blogspot.com requests to your Custom Domain.
    "
    (Blogger comment system can't even cope with blockquotes)


    You know I recently got sick of the interstitials imposed on a redirect to my domain after I left blogger and switched that content back to Blogspot.
    It would be so much easier on your resources if you just allowed people to migrate away from Blogspot if they want to without a major link penalty.

    Note to anyone - never ever use a blogspot subdomain for any content you care about

    Also publishing with Blogger to your own domain you can do fancy stuff like control your robots.txt so your blog gets indexed correctly.

    It has been 6+ months since I pointed out some problems, maybe it is time to highlight why that 5% should just pack their bags as long as they are prepared to lose historical links if they were on a blogspot subdomain at some time in the past.

    ReplyDelete
  34. @Andy That specifically speaks to our ability to host content at a custom domain, but you're right, if you update your settings | publishing | switch to custom domain and insert a domain not managed by us, we'll insert an interstitial indicating that the URL is not managed by Blogger. This was done to avoid Blogger being an open relay for URL redirection, which as you know would be a significant spam vector.

    That said, I've chatted with other providers about figuring out a straightforward (and safe-from-abuse) mechanism for allowing people to switch hosts without such a penalty. It's not the top of my priority list but I will see if I can't get that resolved.

    ReplyDelete
  35. I'm really confused. I got the e-mail today, but don't understand if I need to do anything or not. I don't know if I use FTP for my bog. my URL is http://www.TraciBunkers.blogspot.com

    how do you know if this effects you, whether or not you use ftp, and what you need to do?

    ReplyDelete
  36. Here's my predicament, we host a blog that at domain.com/news and on a very limited server because the people in charge want to "stay local" and Blogger FTP was the ONLY way we were able to keep that up and going. Now it's gone. Poof! Plus I have to explain this to the higher ups that are pretty clueless about this.

    ReplyDelete
  37. @ Traci Bunkers - Your blog is not FTP blog since it contains ".blogspot.com".

    To confirm this please go to Settings->publishing and see what the tab says. If it says "You're publishing on a blogspot.com", you are good. No change is needed.

    ReplyDelete
  38. There are plenty of trust indicators that Google can use.

    Close to 5 years Google account... check
    Adsense account linked to bank account... check
    Adwords account... check
    Close to 5 years feedburner... check (it started off on my blogspot)
    Hacked my way around to move my GFC to primary offsite domain... check

    Low priority at Google really doesn't fill me with confidence that it will ever be resolved.

    Google of all companies should understand that Data Liberation should include link graph, and even an imposed interstitial should
    1. not contain terms that have a negative connotation
    2. should not block PageRank and other linking factors.

    ReplyDelete
  39. My Blogger blog is currently published by FTP to a sub-directory on my domain, avgroup.com/talk. Since I will be unable to publish to a sub-directory, will I be able to migrate my blog to a sub-domain like talk.avgroup.com retain all the previous posts and images, and publish new posts to this subdomain?

    ReplyDelete
  40. The migration tool says "This could be at a subdomain of your current domain (if you currently publish to www.yourdomain.com/blog/, you might want the blog to reside at blog.yourdomain.com), or if you don't own the domain you're publishing to, it might just be a Blogspot URL."

    In other words I am stuck with moving to another blogging tool with just a few weeks notice since I don't own the domain I am publishing to. A Blogspot URL is not an option. Just as well I only have four blogs to worry about. It is the time loss and rescheduling of other tasks that worries me.

    ReplyDelete
  41. @ Jim Haynes - Yes, thats correct. All your blog content will be retained at talk.vgroup.com

    ReplyDelete
  42. @Shameels, so I just copy all my directories & files in /talk to the new subdomain and I am good to go?

    ReplyDelete
  43. @Shameela: thanks for the info and help. I was confused since I got the e-mail, so I thought I needed to do something--the e-mail said I was receiving it because I used FTP.

    ReplyDelete
  44. @Traci - Looking at our info, you *do* have an FTP blog, but it must be one you don't use any more. You're all set.

    ReplyDelete
  45. Sadly this forces me to move forward with wordpress.

    My Blog was here:
    http://www.8774e4voip.com/blog/asterisk-switchvox.html

    RIP Blogger

    ReplyDelete
  46. BTW, I depend on the money that comes in from my FTP'd blog to FEED MY FAMILY. Did Google ever consider that?

    ReplyDelete
  47. Clearly Blogger product management didn't really consider our efforts to wean ourselves from this feature. Giving this much notice means we all have a huge amount of effort to migrate our blogs.

    Blogger, you should have given at least 4 months notice on this one. Your lack of thought nullifies any little trust I may have had.

    ReplyDelete
  48. How disappointing. Bye bye Google!

    ReplyDelete
  49. hey Rick,

    I am sooo confused.

    So, evidently, I use ftp to publish to the root level of my domain http://www.billemory.com/blogger.html

    Because I am publishing on the root level am I somehow exempt from this forced migration?

    ReplyDelete
  50. I have been a long time Blogger user and I believe I even paid some fees for it at some point. This is horrible. FTP is one of the most basic functions of the internet. Why not at least give us the option of paying a couple bucks a month to keep this service supported?

    The main reason I publish to my own server via FTP is because I have other dynamic data driven code on the page (in my blog template) (that is executed via ColdFusion) and not just the static HTML page Blogger would normally produce. This is going to add so much time and frustration to my already over-burdened month I feel like I want to scream. This makes me want to close all my google accounts, and return my Android phone. I will not have kind things to say, especially in Public and to the Press about this 'decision'. "Do no evil?" Lol... maybe Steve Jobs is correct.

    ReplyDelete
  51. @ emory - Unfortunately No. This effects all FTP blogs.

    ReplyDelete
  52. @Jim Haynes - No you can leave the old files in there. I believe this comment summed it up well. http://blogger-ftp.blogspot.com/2010/02/some-background-on-process.html?showComment=1265214391325#c6262492296399971247

    ReplyDelete
  53. That;s hilarious. It's on my own server so OF COURSE if my blog is not updated it won't change. That's because GOOGLE has no CONTROL over it.

    ReplyDelete
  54. For those moving to WordPress, there is a great tool here: http://blogger2wordpress.appspot.com/ put out by Google's DLF.

    Can someone from Google please do a post on this blog about things to consider when moving to another platform? I'm thinking I can just export the blog, run it through the converter mentioned above (or one of the other converters) and import it into the new platform. Are there any gotchas that I'm missing in that thought process?

    ReplyDelete
  55. @snekse, WP has a builtin utility to import blogspot posts so basically just export your orginal *FTP site essentially creating a backup, import the backup into a *.blogspot.com site, then WP can import the *.blogspot site directly. This works with the latest version of WP.

    ReplyDelete
  56. @snekse, you'll need to make sure that the URLs are the same on the WP site or create some REWRITE rules to handles this so that SE, feeds, and previous visitors aren't lost.

    ReplyDelete
  57. @Stephen Reese: Today I finally switched from blogspot to my own hosted wordpress-blog. First I did it exakt the way you desribed it. But when exporting my blog I found, that blogger only exports 200 comments in total!

    I have nearly 2.800 Posts an about 2.100 Comments, so there are quite a lot missing. So I switched my FTP-blog to a blogspot hosted one an imported that into wordpress. Surprisingly that went very smooth. I did not figure out, why the comments posted the last 14 days were not imported. That are something about 50 comments missing and *all* blogpost imported. I'm quite happy with this!

    ReplyDelete
  58. Before the too soon deadline, I intend to switch FTP information in blogspot admin several times so I can backup my blog to a 2nd host that I use for backup.

    That should not be a problem, eh?

    ReplyDelete
  59. Never mind. No need to reply. I'm done. But like many others I'm keeping my stuff on my server. Never had a chance. Guaranteed FAIL.

    Must of sounded good in the meeting though.

    ReplyDelete
  60. I would like to use some of the blogger gadgets not available through ftp so don't mind being forced to change. However, I do want to keep the current .co.uk domain which people know and is linked to, and not move to .com . Is that an option?

    ReplyDelete
  61. @Backstreeter - I believe you can keep that domain.

    ReplyDelete
  62. "your existing posts will continue to function just fine"

    Are they going to have busted Post-a-comment links? I assume that the Post-a-comment link targets will be 404 in the near future. Seeing as how they probably couldn't FTP the new comments to my site anyhow.

    I'd resigned myself to writing a script to clean those links out. But if I don't gotta write that script, I'm happy to be lazy. I'd sure love to hear that I'm overlooking something.

    ReplyDelete
  63. So much Google openness and transparency. I asked some questions, including why this had been so badly managed - ie little notice and even then only a promise that a migration tool would be available three weeks later. I was angry but not abusive. I logged back in today to see if this had been answred and, whaddya know, the comment had been deleted. Wordpress it is.

    ReplyDelete
  64. I'd like to repeat lahosken's question about comments: If i post no further and do nothing with my currently ftp-published blog posts, will blogger still continue to facilitate comments to those posts? Unless i hear differently, i will assume not, since every comment would involve some ftp uploading to my site.

    ReplyDelete
  65. Hi all - just noting that the FAQ is updated, addressing a number of recent questions raised on this and other posts.

    ReplyDelete
  66. Note: Comments are closed on this post. Please direct general questions to the FAQ page, and specific problems with the migration tool to the issue tracker. More details about support for the FTP migration are here.

    ReplyDelete