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Wednesday, March 17, 2010

Advanced setup: moving from www to www

A number of users have asked about preserving their current URL. We opted not to support this scenario with the Migration Tool because of the risk of breaking file URLs in the process -- but several of you have asked about the best way to do this and I promised a blog post documenting it.

Scenario: You host a blog at www.myblog.com, published via FTP. You host your blog (and only your blog) at this address, and you want to continue to use Blogger to publish to www.myblog.com using Blogger's Custom Domains feature. This walk-through will identify the steps needed to do that. Keep in mind that any files you previously hosted on www.myblog.com -- like uploaded images, PDFs, etc., whether they're www.myblog.com/resume.pdf or www.myblog.com/uploads/images/foo.jpg -- are currently hosted at www.myblog.com too. Note: When you update your domain so that www.myblog.com points to Blogger's servers, any references to those files will break unless you follow these instructions.

1. Create your "missing files" CNAME. This will be a secondary domain you will create that will act as a backup for requests that go to Blogger which result in a 404.  (More on this issue here.) To create the CNAME, pick a name for this backup domain ("files" is a popular choice) and point it at your webhost's IP address. If you have a question about setting up this CNAME, check with your domain registrar and/or webhost. (It's possible, through a tool like CPanel, that your webhost has simplified tools for this step. Check with them.)


Important: pick an image that currently works at www.myblog.com and verify that it also works at files.myblog.com before proceeding. It may take up to a few hours for DNS to propagate; be patient.

2. At Blogger.com, click on "Settings | Publishing" and click on "Switch to: Custom Domain".


Click "Advanced":

and type in your domain ("www.myblog.com").




3. Click "yes" under "Use a Missing Files Host" and type in the URL you picked in step 1.


4. Fill in the word verification, and click "save settings".

5. Now update the CNAME for 'www' at your domain registrar, so that 'www' points to 'ghs.google.com.' (The trailing period is important.)

Once you click "save settings", Blogger will immediately start serving requests it receives for www.myblog.com. There may be a delay of a few hours as your DNS changes propagate. That's it -- by following these steps you will successfully convert your FTP blog into a Blogger Custom Domain blog and keep the same URL you had before.

184 comments:

  1. Wouldn't it just be simpler to move all of the files from the current myblog.com server to the blogger server, then change DNS to point at the blogger server? Everything should stay the same, all links should work, and all future posts should just be added to the existing ones without any issues, correct?

    Where I am confused is WHERE do I post the files? Does every blogger user have a default folder to put these things in?

    Where are images hosted that we posted to our blogs? They don't get sent to to the hosting server anymore, they are hosted somewhere else on blogger's servers.

    You folks are making this way harder than it needs to be, IMHO. I would like to see it explained in simple language - exactly where should we upload our blog files/folders? Not 'use the tool', as that doesn't tell us old-timers where the files are going, or if they are going anywhere at all.

    I want to manually move my files. This is the issue.

    It it can be explained that the tool manually moves the files, I want to know where, and how do I directly access the fileshare so I can move my blog files into it.

    Also - nobody has ever explained what ghs.google.com. is or why the dns should point to that.

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  2. @Mike: We do not host files other than blog posts. That's why you can't upload everything to us - we are not an arbitrary file host.

    ghs.google.com is Google's hosting infrastructure, which makes it possible for us to host blogs at domains other than our own.

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  3. Rather than figure this all out im leaving Blogspot. It seems you want rights to our content and im not cool with that. Cant think of any other reason you would make us host the files on your server... Bye.

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  4. @Mike and @johnkanesmith: Blogger doesn't host ANY files (except images, separately). Duplicate copies of all your posts are stored as text in their database. They always have been stored in a database, and will continue to be after the migration. What is different after migration is that when a visitor clicks a link to your page, Blogger's software will pull the text out of its database, crunch it through the template, and spit out a complete HTML page on the fly. That's why it is so much faster to update the site after a change affecting many pages: Blogger doesn't need to update (as in "republish entire blog") all those HTML files, because they don't exist until someone requests them.

    People who have always been using Blogspot or custom domains have all the images stored in Blogger's image server, but have had to host other types of files elsewhere. People on FTP have had all their images and files stored on their own hosts. The links in the articles point to that private host. If the host goes offline, the links will be broken.

    @Rick: A couple of clarification questions please:

    1. I could set up a missing files host as a safety precaution, but I have already gone to the trouble of editing all the HREFs to point to the "naked" domain (no "www.") It works on a temporary blogspot blog, and the support people at the hosting service say that should work, and that all I'll need is the CNAME record pointing to ghs.google.com. Does that make sense to you?

    2. Your description suggest that the CNAME record should be added AFTER telling Blogger what the custom domain is. I had been planning to update the CNAME record first, then telling Blogger to change to the custom domain. Is your method preferable?

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  5. Rick,
    How do you intend for us to configure the custom domain when the current domain is a COMPLETE ACTIVE WEBSITE (NOT LIMITED TO YOUR BLOGGER COMPONENT) and we have no immediate plans for changing the domain name, moving the website or using Google domain hosting???

    Your example and instructions appear to suggest that the custom domain is ONLY USED TO HOST YOUR BLOGGER CONTENT.

    Would you please post a clear description ASAP of how your new plan accommodates the common use-case of blog integration into existing complete websites?

    Integration of the blog into existing websites has been the exact functionality (as previously evangelized by Google) that has driven our selection and use of your blogger tool.

    Thanks

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  6. @Surfwriter: In that case, you would need to host the blog at a subdomain (blog.yourdomain.com) - we do not have (nor will we have) the ability to incorporate Blogger-hosted content into existing domains, comingled with non-Blogger-hosted content.

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  7. Rick,

    Would you please post a clear and complete description of all requirements, steps and settings necessary to configure and use a sub-domain as a replacement for the FTP service that Google is discontinuing?

    Thanks

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  8. Seconding Surfwriter's request for a clear and complete explanation. Rick, your quick how-to video is really useful *except* that it skips over the most complicated and potentially dangerous part of the process -- configuring A and CNAME records. I'm reluctant to tweak my A records for a trial run because I don't understand what the exact consequences will be on the rest of my site.

    Here's my situation:

    I have a large, 8-year-old site at www.website.com/blog, which I plan (reluctantly) to switch to blog.website.com. Years ago I created a separate Blogger blog that I use for testing before making major changes to the main site's template. It lives at www.website.com/experiment. Yesterday, I created a CNAME subdomain (I've never done this before) called experiment.website.com and began the migration process as a test. 24 hours later, I'm still not seeing the "Hosted by Blogger" message, so I assume I've done something wrong. I also assume it's because I didn't change the A records, which, again, I'm reluctant to do because I don't understand *exactly* what to change or how, precisely, it will affect www.website.com as a whole.

    I'm a fairly experienced web developer and technical writer who has been using Blogger FTP service on personal and professional projects for nearly nine years, so this change in your service is incredibly frustrating and has brought my productivity on current projects to a halt. I don't know how big the Blogger team is, but investing in one or two instructional designers would have bought you a lot of good will.

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  9. @Darren: My own advice: Don't mess with the A records! That could screw both sites up. The key, I think, is the CNAME record.

    I have pulled a lot of hair out over this migration, but I have successfully migrated two sites and am almost ready to do the third, and then I'm done. The only thing I've changed are CNAME records.

    To my good fortune, the first two sites were on Yahoo! Small Business hosting, which only takes about 30 minutes to effect a change in the domain records. The third one is on another hosting service (Pair.com) and they are warning me that it could take several days for the changeover. I suspect yours is like that. Please be patient.

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  10. You should only configure the A records if you want to host a naked domain at Google. Subdomains (blog.mydomain.com) do not require the modification of an A record.

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  11. Unfortunately, this blog post came just a little too late for me. I just finished the migration the other day—and yes, I would have much preferred to keep my old URL with no added subdomain. If you guys could develop a streamlined, user-friendly (for us non-technical types) way of going back to the old URL without the new subdomain, I would greatly appreciate it.

    If you would, please consider brainstorming this. Even if I had to wait a few months before that process could be user-friendly, it would be worth it. Thank you.

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  12. @Rick, thanks for this blog post (I asked for this scenario in another comment) - a few questions though:

    * In your comment "two steps up" you talk about the "A" record, and I get the impression it's involved in the "naked" scenario - however, the post we are commenting on only talks about CNAME, nor the A record, or?

    * I have very few "other" files hosted at my domain at the moment, so I am not worried about looing them (can handle that if needed), and the "missing files" CNAME should take care of that anyway.

    * I'm using the "completely naked" domain (without www) as the main URL to my blog - this post describes the scenario where the URL starts with www - how does this affect the setup?
    (in my case both thekillerattitude.com and www.thekillerattitude.com goes to my blog, but I'm promoting the one without www as the main entrance - thus I'd like both to point to the blog after the migration).

    (* And if I'd like to use my current webhost for other pages (with a subdomain) I guess I can create a CNAME for eg otherstuff.mydomain.com, pointing to my webhost IP?)

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  13. Hm, tried to understand a bit more...

    It seems like I need to change the A record to point the "completely naked" domain (no www) to you, right? In that case:
    - To what shall I change the A record? ghs.google.com.?

    - If I modify the A record, will I still be able to add CNAMEs at my webhost control panel? (Or will the "top control" of the domain move to you?)

    Sorry for my lack of understanding of the area of A and CNAME...

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  14. @Johan: Pardon me for jumping in.

    I should think you DON'T want to add any A records, or you'll be in danger of shutting down access to your current hosting site completely. That will mean your images and files hosted there (and linked to by your blog posts) can't be reached any more.

    Adding a CNAME record does nothing more than create a subdomain, and in this case point it at Google instead of to a subdirectory on your own host. By the way, "www" is actually also just a subdomain that is set up on most systems by default because most system managers keep their HTML stuff separate from their other files. If you use a shared hosting service, in all probability "www" is actually pointing to a completely different server from your main root. It may be that the OS is automatically redirecting HTTP:// traffic there, even if the www is not specified.

    I have just today done a successful www to www transition, for a site hosted by Pair.com. What I did:

    1. Created a CNAME caled "files" pointing to the naked domain. That way, I could specify it to Blogger as a missing files host, for safety's sake.

    2. Created a CNAME "www" and pointed it to "ghs.google.com".

    3. Switched the blog from FTP to custom domain, with the www prefix, putting Blogger on notice that it would be receiving the www traffic. The migration tool was unnecessary.

    It took about an hour for the DNS transition to happen. Until then, traffic continued to hit my host. Afterwards, it started going to Google/Blogger.

    One more thing: People could still get to the "old" site with a naked domain URL (no www), although just about any link they clicked would take them to the www version. But I edited that index.html page by hand to remove the blog posts save for one, which is a headline linking them to the correct page.

    I have never made any effort to promote the site's URL without the www. Good thing, too, because from the logs it appears (a) most people bookmarked it with www and are going to the correct place (Blogger), and (b) Google Search tends to use the www version of the URLs.

    Your situation may be different. But if you want to re-direct naked domain URLS as well as www URLs, I suspect it's going to be very problematic. If your domain is only going to host one web site, you should use www. If you are going to host additional websites, you will want to have individual subdomains for each, but you could continue to direct www to the main one.

    Hope this helps. Best regards to Stockholm, Sweden. I have visited twice, and on one trip traveled deep into the countryside, to Uddeholm and vicinity. Very beautiful.

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  15. ...and, looking at your site, I think you may want to edit your settings and your template before you make the DNS changes. All your internal links (in the sidebar, for example) omit the www. That is probably because you have specified the Blog URL as such, under Settings / Publishing. If you are going to switch to www, do it now and republish the entire blog through FTP.

    But wait. Before you do that, there is another question (that unfortunately I can't answer): Could you "migrate" from naked domain to www? Would the migration tool deal with that situation properly, or would it choke?

    If the migration tool would work, then you have this extra benefit: The tool would go through all your existing pages and add the code to automatically transfer visitors to the www versions (after 30 secs). This might be a lot better for you, especially if external sites have linked to you without the www.

    I'm quite certain the migration tool would NOT work on naked to naked, or any other same-to-same scenario. And the only way I can see your continuing to promote the naked domain URLs would be for you to:
    1. Move all your images and files to another host/domain,
    2. Fix all the links in all your articles to use the new URLs.
    3. Drop your current hosting service but retain the domain.
    4. Specify both CNAME and A records.
    5. And take the risk that your site goes offline while all of this is happening.
    That is so problematic, I can't see even attempting it.

    It seems to me the smarteest way to go (if the migration tool handles it) is to migrate from naked to www. You could also fix the URLs in the sidebar, but then you would want to be certain that the publishing settings are changed back (to naked) before you finally migrate. I would guess that the migration tool could handle this migration (naked to www), but Rick Klau would have to be the authority.

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  16. I am so utterly frustrated by this whole task I could scream! I have spent countless HOURS just trying to figure out what the ---- everyone is talking about! I am NOT a computer geek and this process just has me totally confused. I can't even get my registrar to assist me and that's REALLY annoying. I'm considering switching to the so-called "simple" WordPress.com NOT EVEN THE MORE COMPLICATED .ORG program ... and I can't figure out how to take my domain name with me nor can I get on their forum to ask, because I haven't downloaded their program yet! Argghhh!!!

    If there is anyone OUT THERE who can tell me how I set up WordPress.com AND use my domain name I'd be so happy to hear from you!

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  17. @Rick,

    I join in @Mrs. Muddled frustrations.

    Your step by step procedure above is for people who want to continue to use naked domains, but the procedure is incomplete. You do not mention A records at all, yet in an answer to a question, you say you must use an A record for naked domains.

    PLEASE pretend you are us, and assume nothing. See if your procedure really works. It doesn't!

    I have added a C NAME record at my host first to files CNAME mrconsumer.com. but not view a gif file as you suggest. Then I removed that and added a CNAME that said files CNAME 123.456.789.10 (whatever my host's IP address is), and I still could not view the gif.

    I have not gone further in that process because the instructions are so UNCLEAR.

    In my case, I started going through the migration tool and stopped after inputting a subdomain, realizing that I don't want to rename my blog, but want to continue using www.mrconsumer.com .

    As a result of going partway through the migration process, (but not completing the process), your system nonetheless changed my blogger settings away from FTP. Support staff told me how to return to the FTP mode, and I did that, but CANNOT ADD NEW POSTS to my blog. (I keep getting the it is going to take longer to update your blog message.)

    I have posted this problem on your spreadsheet tracker tool, and no one has been able to fix it! See issue 228 and 218 for mrconsumer.com .

    I am reaching out to you for HELP on all these issues.

    Thanks,
    Edgar

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  18. @Edgar: You said, "Your step by step procedure above is for people who want to continue to use naked domains, but the procedure is incomplete. You do not mention A records at all, yet in an answer to a question, you say you must use an A record for naked domains."

    I do not believe that is correct. Rick's procedure above states that is for those who want to continue to use their "www." subdomain. "A" records are NOT needed. In fact, they could shut down all access to your hosting service.

    N.B.: Web surfers are in the habit of typing the naked domain (without the "www.") as a lazy shortcut. They may not realize it, but that trick works mainly because when the server finally gets the request (after DNS lookups), it recognizes that it is an HTTP request (even without the www.) and automatically deflects the request to whatever server/directory is also serving the "www." subdomain.

    You would use "A" records for the naked domain only if you owned the domain by itself -- not attached to a hosting service. In that case, you'd use CNAME to direct the "www." subdomain to Google's servers, and A records to do the same for the "naked" domain. Were you to buy the custom domain through Google, that is how it would be set up.

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  19. Okay, I drank the Google Kool-Aid. I thought switching the servers was going to be a MAJOR pain but it turned out to be really simple.

    I understand the principal here, especially not messing with the A Name. As long as the missing files host is set up properly, it's really just like putting on a few front page.

    Now I have to start complaining to Blogger.com that I would like a setup wherein the old upload feature had an option to load files onto my host that I still plan on keeping.

    Other than that, the conversion was painless. I was one of the biggest complainers about this move but Rick's post on the subject made it simple.

    THANK YOU!!!

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  20. Something just came to me though.

    I didn't upload my old posts to blogger/google servers.

    I won't be able to edit them after Blogger.com drops FTP support will I?

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  21. It's all "Dutch" to me. I'm not a computer geek and I can't figure out how to do it. For me would have been easier to have a button to click on (i.e., UPDATE) and the changes are made. The process to make the change is horrific to me!!!

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  22. @Tony - All your old posts have always been in Blogger's database -- and still are. You can find them in Edit Posts (if you scroll back) and you can still edit them and republish them.

    What can't be edited is the full-HTML copy that's on your host server. But your visitors won't be going to that copy any more. They will get the fresh copy direct from Google/blogger.

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  23. @MaggiLiz - I sympathize. I'm pretty technical and it was still a nightmare for me. Mainly it was the worrying. I had three important (read: other people's) blogs to convert, each with a different situation, and I worried to death that I'd screw them up. But they all finally got converted just fine.

    FTP blogging is not for the faint of heart. There are just too many moving parts. It's understandable that Google wanted out of that business -- which they got into only because it was the only way to give people custom URLs (omitting the .blogspot) If you were starting a blog today, you could get the custom URL directly from Google and you wouldn't have to see, much less understand, those ugly moving parts.

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  24. Can anyone tell me if a move like this will affected my Search Engine ranking or its just as good as my external host( SEO view).

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  25. I've followed every step completely (for a subdomain blog on my own personal domain) over 2 days ago and my blog is not working still. Blogger will not let me post new posts and it keeps trying to redirect me. How do I change this to make it function properly?

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  26. @Alana - please post specific problems to the issue tracker. Our support team and engineers will make sure to address those issues as quickly as possible.

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  27. Much of my blog has been organically indexed on Google. Now that I have moved my blog from www.mysite.com/blog to the subdomain blog, I have dozens of search results that are no longer pointing to the correct website. Does anyone have a suggestion for redirecting users from those search results to my new blog?

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  28. @jp If you used the migration tool, it would have added two lines of code near the top of each of your old post pages. One line would transfer your human visitors (after 30 secs) to the corresponding replacement page. The other line would tell Google's "bots" to start indexing your new page instead of the old one. It probably takes a few days (at least!) before Googlebot gets round to visiting all your old pages and noticing the move.

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  29. I have 8 blogs - for 8 complete sites - Six of them under this account and two more under another account. I'm just not terribly motivated to move them all or anything.... plus the reading involved (articles plus comments) is a bit overwhelming. The comments are very important because it shows me what problems I may run across if I attempt to make the move.

    Seriously, if I do absolutely nothing at all -- the posts that already exist will still be accessible right? I just won't be able to post any new blogs - am I getting that part of it right at least?

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  30. I watched the video and it skips over a key and vital step, setting up the FNAME and subdomain. How do you do this? Where does the subdomain need to point? Why is this not in the video?

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  31. @CTCSC It varies by registrar, and I made the conscious decision not to further confuse matters by showing how it looks for my registrar when yours may be different. The migration tool has links to our help documentation, which is here.

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  32. @CTCSC: Surely that is a typo and you meant to say CNAME? Because there is no "FNAME" type listed here.

    The subdomain CNAME, e.g. www.example.com, needs to point to ghs.google.com.

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  33. May I reserve a .blogspot.com name before I make the switch?

    sam smith, prorev.com

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  34. @TPR No, you should just pick it during your migration.

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  35. What is the actual value of preserving the current URL? The migration tool is designed to solve the redirect problem. Rick, would you recommend the migration tool over moving from www to www?

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  36. @michael "If you used the migration tool, it would have added two lines of code"

    We did use the migration tool, and the lines of code WERE added to the new blog -- blog.mysite.com, but not to the old blog -- mysite.com/blog. I am not sure how that is helpful. If it worked like you are saying, it would be helpful. Does anyone have a suggestion for adding that code to the hundreds of pages on the old version of the blog?

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  37. @bitbypit: It's entirely up to you. Since different people feel differently about this, I chose to simply document how to do it if it matters. Up to you.

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  38. I have another question. On the migration tool, why is the refresh set to 30 seconds? Why not 0 seconds for a more seamless user experience? What is the thinking behind 30 seconds?

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  39. @bitbypit: Shorter refresh intervals can be interpreted as hijacking the page, which is often a signal that the page is malicious in nature. We talked with the search quality team at Google, and they suggested a delay so that Googlebot (our crawler) and others could properly index the code and not penalize the page for abruptly transferring visitors from one page to another.

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  40. @Rick, care to have a look at my questions further up among the comments? Still not sure how to do to keep my "full monty" domain (no www or anything..)

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  41. Thank you -- I suspected hijacking or a type of abuse.

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  42. So my options (as I understand them) are :
    1> Move to blogger, re-post my images that are saved on the remote server - editing posts that refer to them, etc. This eliminates the need for the 'missing-files' tweak. I can also leave my CNAME alone as long as I have a redirect in place on the old host server.

    2> Move away from blogger entirely, and find a new front-end to manage my blog entries, archives, etc. No changes to CNAME, but massive edits required, most likely.

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  43. So is the procedure for moving from www to www the same for moving blog to blog (e.g. blog.puzzalot.com to blog.puzzalot.com)?

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  44. Dear Rick,
    I just migrated my blog to a custom domain, and none of my comments have come over. Can you advise me as to what to do? Many thanks,
    Chris

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  45. Sorry, I ought to have said: I have migrated from
    http://www.christilling.de/blog/ctblog.html
    to
    http://blog.christilling.de/

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  46. @Chris: As noted in the FAQ, comments may take up to a couple hours to replicate to the new URL. No data is lost, and they will appear within an hour or two.

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  47. My dashboard says I need to migrate some or all of my Blogger blogs. But when I hit 'start migration now' NO blogs are listed at the top.

    And I see no way to back up my blog either.

    Should I be worried?

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  48. @Robert Reid: You can back up ("export") your blog at any time from Settings | Basic ! Blog Tools ! Export blog.

    Your blog is only an FTP blog if, under Settings ! Publishing, you see a long list of fields/questions beginning with FTP Server.

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  49. I have a question which doesn't seem to have been answered, at least not to my knowledge!

    I have a blog at http://www.blocparty.net/blogparty. Is it possible to keep this address using the ftp migration tool, or at least point this address to the new place? I'd like visitors who enter this address to be pointed to the new blog.

    All the advice I've seen so far has been regarding subdomains, rather than folders.
    Thanks in advance for any help...hope this question isn't too stupid!

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  50. @James: From the FAQ:

    Why can’t I keep publishing at a sub-directory?
    The way the system is set up, blogs must be hosted at a discrete domain.

    You will not be able to maintain the folder/directory path; blogs hosted by us must be at the root of a domain. You could set up blogparty.blocparty.net, blog.blockparty.net, or any variation that uses a subdomain.

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  51. @Rick: Thanks for the quick reply!

    The reason I ask is because it would take me a long time to change all the links on my site (it's not very well designed!).

    So the best way is to use the Migration Tool and choose a new subdomain? Then Blogger will sort out moving the blog from a sub-directory to the new subdomain?

    What will happen to my current blocparty.net/blogparty.html page once ftp publishing is stopped? If I post a final announcement to forward users to the new address will it remain there?

    Thanks

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  52. Hi Rick,
    The comments still haven't copied over - everything else has, and it says that the process is complete. Can you help me out at all?

    I have migrated from
    http://www.christilling.de/blog/ctblog.html
    to
    http://blog.christilling.de/

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  53. Just want to verify...should my www CNAME resolve to 74.125.93.121 when I ping it?

    The files CNAME that I set up resolved very quickly to my domain IP Address but am still waiting on the www CNAME.

    Thanks.

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  54. Any ideas, Rick. I also asked in the Blogger forum, but no response yet.
    All the best,
    Chris

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  55. I migrated two blogs yesterday and used custom domains to point to them after the migration was complete. Yesterday they both worked fine. Today neither of them will load which is very frustrating.
    www.stlouisceremonies.com and www.cynthiareegblog.com

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  56. @Chris: Please file a ticket with the issue tracker, that's where the support and eng teams are triaging any issues relating to FTP migrations.

    @St. Louis Web Designer: Both blogs load just fine for me, may be a DNS caching issue on your computer. It will likely resolve itself, but if it doesn't, please file a ticket in the issue tracker.

    @OLTIV: Yes, that's correct.

    @James: The existing FTP'd files will contain new code that points search engines and visitors to the new URLs.

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  57. I use Google Custom Search to search the static and blog pages of my website (www.domain.com and www.domain/blog/) After the migration, the 2 lines of code you just mentioned will correct this automatically (the canonical code), and I will not need to adjust my existing Google sitemap.txt.

    I could not find any related information in the Google Custom Search forum. Please share any important web links that address how the Blogger FTP migration might affect Google Custom Search and Google Webmaster Tools.

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  58. Need a confirmation about the A record. I moved my www.domain.com to www.domain.com. Pointed www ghs.google.com. Pointed A record to Google IP address. Created CNAME for files.domain.com as a missing files host. As the result, the images are not displayed. Should've I kept the A record untouched?

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  59. @yaromir Please keep all specific issues in the issue tracker. We've got a bunch of people staffing that and it's much more efficient to have all specific problems reported/tracked there.

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  60. I tried to set up a custom domain for a former FTP site. I set up the advanced settings to point to weblog.schrysler.com I set up my cname entry to point to GHS.GOOGLE.COM however all I can get now is Googles 404 page not found. I think something went wrong when I tried to used the FTP migration tool. I used the toll for status.cacusguy.com as above and it worked just fine.

    ReplyDelete
  61. @yaromir: Why don't you delete the A record and see if it fixes the problem? (I suspect it will.)

    ReplyDelete
  62. I double checked and the A record is gone. I only have CNAME (alias) to ghs.google.com.

    ReplyDelete
  63. For those of us who can't figure out how to make the switch can you tell us what will happen to our blogs after May 1?

    Will be switching from Blogger to a different platform but don't know if I will be able to get that completed by May 1.

    ReplyDelete
  64. I've been transferring over to WordPress, leaving my old FTP Blogs on Blogger as they were so that Blogger members can use the Blogger link. My only problem is that I can't get my WordPress blog to feed into Blogger any more even though I have Google Friend Connect and Feed Burner.

    I suspect the problem is in the Site Feed area of Settings in Blogger as I have a new WordPress blog with the same setup that is feeding through Blogger just fine.

    Is there a way to set up the site feed URL in Blogger Settings? Or do I need to just delete the old FTP blogs from Blogger all together because it's confusing things? I've tried putting in my new Feed Burner URL and the Atom URL from WordPress in the Blogger Site Feed, but to no avail.

    ReplyDelete
  65. I am confused. I have a website and on that site I have a blogger blog: mywebsite.com/blog

    Does this change mean that I can no longer have my own website at my domain, on the current host and still have a blogger blog on my own domain with the same URL? If I cannot host my blog and I must lose the SEO benefit, won't I have to find an alternative blog solution?

    ReplyDelete
  66. @baggirom You cannot continue to have Blogger publish content to the URL you currently use (mywebsite.com/blog). You can either redirect mywebsite.com/blog to blog.mywebsite.com, or, as you note, you can use another weblog app that can publish to subdirectories on your domain.

    ReplyDelete
  67. From a reader:

    "
    You may notice a drop in traffic from now on. Your recent move to Blog Spot has effectively silenced your voice for anyone reading from a corporate/government computer system running Websense (a shame, since they're probably the ones who need to read this most). You are now ranked amongst the likes of okcupid, Facebook and MySpace as a "Social Networking & Personal" site. Not even your RSS feed can get through."

    Any thoughts on this?

    ReplyDelete
  68. @TPR I spoke to a Websense support person, who said that any questions about Websense's filtering should be sent to suggest@websense.com. Send a URL to them, they will review it and properly classify it. (I have sent an e-mail suggesting that a blanket *.blogspot.com classification is unnecessary and overly broad; but it can't hurt to send an e-mail yourself about your own URL.)

    ReplyDelete
  69. ARRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!

    GOOGLE SHOULD RENAME TO GIGGLE - YOU ARE KILLING ME!

    ReplyDelete
  70. Wheres my images - i love wasting hours pissing around cos you lot feel like changing things why should we use you again. Who's to say you're not gonna put people through this again.... ZERO TRUST now, WORDPRESS every time from here on in.

    ReplyDelete
  71. how can I have my index file on blog.crashburnproductions.com point to the path images/header_blog.jpg (and I know I've loaded the image there!) and it not show - HELP ME!

    ReplyDelete
  72. is this the end of flash on blogger blogs

    ReplyDelete
  73. can one of you superstars at google elaborate on this useless answer in your FAQ.

    # What if my site is already blog.domain.com, can I simply change the CNAME to point to Blogger?

    * Yes. But note that previously uploaded files will no longer be served, unless you configure a secondary CNAME and set up Blogger's missing files host. You will need to migrate manually, as the migration tool will not set up missing files host settings automatically.


    What does migrate manually mean - will you be giving me access to your server so I can upload the files I need?? No. Didnt think so. Not only do you screw everyone over - you do it without explanation.

    ReplyDelete
  74. Hi Rick,

    since I'm using Wordpress now I just keep the old FTP blog on my domain just because of the pictures of my old blog posts which are currently linked to photos.blogger.com.
    Do I still need to move the blog , i.e. will the pics or links to the pics be lost after May 1st?

    ReplyDelete
  75. @Samuel: The text of this post describes in detail what it means to migrate manually.

    @fibbz: You do not need to do anything.

    ReplyDelete
  76. Thanks Rick for the quick answer and the clarification.

    ReplyDelete
  77. I'll be manually cutting and pasting new html to occasionally update my blog. Thanks Google for screwing up an easy and nice thing for the most sophisticated of the Bloggers.

    And of course, any new blogs will be far away from amateur hour at "blogspot".

    ReplyDelete
  78. Issue #82 in the issue tracker is still unresolved, even though it was marked fixed by someone on your team on Mar 18. I commented in the issue tracker about the problem still not being fixed on March 19 (including a copy of the file and a screen-shot), and also here in the blog, but I haven't heard anything since. Can anyone tell me what is going on?

    ReplyDelete
  79. I have a blog that's being published to a University website that doesn't provide PHP or MySQL so I can't use Wordpress, but Blogger FTP has been working perfectly. I can't redirect the website since I don't personally control the domain (ualberta.ca). Is there any way I can keep my blog updating without purchasing a new domain or running off blogspot.com?

    ReplyDelete
  80. @Ian Unfortunately, no.

    @Dr. Moondog: Thanks for letting me know, I'm meeting with the team today to review open issues and will make sure to get back to you asap.

    ReplyDelete
  81. I previously reported that the Progressive Review was being banned by Websense at some government and corporate sites after we had switched to a blogspot.com address. Thanks to contact by Rick and our own letter to the firm, Websense promptly switched our status to "news and media." Thanks for your help, Rick - Sam Smih, Editor, Progressive Review.

    ReplyDelete
  82. Let's see if something google does not like get the same treatment.

    ReplyDelete
  83. @TPR Great news, glad to see Websense was that responsive.

    ReplyDelete
  84. I get the following message "Another blog is already hosted at this address" any suggestions?

    ReplyDelete
  85. @Malik: Please file specific issues at the issue tracker. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  86. Is it ok to do something like this:
    Go to blogspot and create a secret domain (mysecretdomain.blogspot.com), write my blog, then save my blog's webpages onto my hardrive and upload it to my webhost (and I'll tweak the html files so it'll link within my site).

    Just wondering if its against the Terms of Use or anything.

    ReplyDelete
  87. @moviemakerrules That is not against our ToS.

    ReplyDelete
  88. I understand that all links to other files need to be "redone" in the migration. What I don't understand is photo's. Are these being "replublished" (so taken from my domain and moved to Blogger environment) during the migration process or not?

    THX

    ReplyDelete
  89. @Familie Schutte: If the URLs to the photos will still work, you'll be fine. If the photos live at www.familieschutte.com/images/house.jpg, and you're moving your blog to blog.familieschutte.com, the HTML in your posts will continue to point to www.familieschutte.com/images/house.jpg.

    ReplyDelete
  90. So I tried the migration tool and made it most of the way through, but ended up with this error:

    There was a problem updating your FTP server. Click here to download a ZIP file archive of you blog, which you can manually upload to your FTP host.

    now what should I do?
    thank you,
    Leslie

    http://blog.kaligear.com

    ReplyDelete
  91. @Leslie: Do what is indicated in the directions: unzip the archive file and upload the files to your FTP host, replacing the existing HTML files for your blog so that they contain the redirect code to your new blog.

    ReplyDelete
  92. If my blog was at domain.com/blog and i migrated to blog.domain.com will Google resolve www.blog.domain.com and http://blog.domain.com ? So far I haven't got the former to work though my entries are pointing to ghs.google.com, any thoughts on how to get it working ?

    Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  93. My blog is currently hosted in a subdirectory of a subdomain (romana.dreamingheart.net/blog.php) I do not own the domain, but was given space to use as a personal website, and my blog is not the only content I have. Will I be able to use the custom domain to migrate my blog and still use this subdomain (or a variation of it?)

    ReplyDelete
  94. I am so frustrated! I did the migration a couple weeks ago and lost all my picuters. I changed the site to blogspot, custom domain...everything, and still no pictures and with 2 babies at home, it's difficult to concentrate and see what went wrong! How can I restore my pics into my blog? Could you please explain it in a very simple and clear way? http://wateenzooitjezeg.blogspot.com/
    Thank you

    ReplyDelete
  95. My blogspot is www.bethniquetteart.blogspot.com do I still need to change to this new way of doing things? Or am I already doing it?

    This is REALLY confusing. I'm having a hard time understanding the directions given.

    ReplyDelete
  96. Well I can see what I will be working on for my friend this weekend. She's a non-technical person and is freaked out that her blogs will die as of the beginning of May. She also has multiple blogs under different directories on one domain. Is there a blog post which basically lays out what is happening so I can come up to speed on this and tell her what her options are?

    ReplyDelete
  97. Rick, under step 1 you say: "To create the CNAME, pick a name for this backup domain ('files' is a popular choice) and point it at your webhost's IP address."

    Does "point it at" mean "redirect it to"?

    ReplyDelete
  98. Need help. Did everything as instructed. Blogger tells me I migrated, but when I click on the website link I get a "NOT FOUND" Google reject message that the URL is not there.

    ReplyDelete
  99. How do I simply download all my current blog posts on blogger to a storage drive (my own) and then be done with whatever this migration thing. Is "saving" my current blogger stuff possible.

    I'm sorry, I don't understand how to execute anything you're asking and neither do the very I/T savy folks I've asked the help of.

    ReplyDelete
  100. Unfortunately, this configuration is not allowed on the type of account that I am using.
    However my domain registrar told me that I should be able to set the Cname to ghs.1.google.com, which directly links with an IP address. Could this be used as well or can I use an IP address in my registrars configuration? (which one)
    What should I do?
    Regards,
    Eddy

    ReplyDelete
  101. @Eddy: The CNAME should point to ghs.google.com; we do not publish IP addresses for ghs.google.com as it can change from time to time.

    ReplyDelete
  102. @JES: That's the CNAME configuration. In your domain DNS settings, you're asked to indicate where the CNAME should point; you need to specify your webhost's IP address.

    @Helpel: Go to settings | export blog.

    ReplyDelete
  103. @Beth: http://blogger-ftp.blogspot.com/2010/02/whos-affected.html

    ReplyDelete
  104. @Mini Cuties: So sorry to hear that; the good news is that the images are almost certainly still online, just being referenced in the blog posts in a way that needs a little tweaking. Please file an issue with the Issue Tracker so our support guys can look into it.

    ReplyDelete
  105. @webmaster: Technically those are two distinct CNAMEs/web addresses and will not resolve to the same blog. I'd recommend against trying to propagate two different aliases for the same URL; if your blog address is blog.domain.com, that should be the URL you direct people to.

    ReplyDelete
  106. @Romana1: You will need the owner of that domain to do the CNAME configuration for you if you want to be able to publish to that domain.

    ReplyDelete
  107. @ToddC: Her blog will not die on 5/1, but her ability to update it from within Blogger.com will unless she migrates to Blogger hosting.

    This entire blog is designed to both explain what's happening, why we're doing it, and what users can do (use the migration tool, manually migrate themselves) to stay on Blogger.

    I've answered user questions on most of the comment threads as they pertained to the migration, and if users have any problems they can file an issue in the Issue Tracker.

    ReplyDelete
  108. Migrated a blogsite across to google this afternoon - everything works fine, EXCEPT links in the FLASH header don't work.

    I since found out a Macromedia Flash movie playing in a web browser is not allowed to access data that resides outside the exact web domain (mydomain.co.uk) from which the SWF originated for security reasons. According to their cross-domain policy file (http://kb2.adobe.com/cps/142/tn_14213.html) I need to upload and XML file to the root directory for BOTH http://blog.mydomain.co.uk/ AND http://mydomain.co.uk

    But the subdomain isn't on my server it's at ghs.google.com so is anyone aware of a workaround as this affects anyone with an SWF navigation?

    ReplyDelete
  109. I'm having a similar issue with one of my blogs as well. Rick, any feedback?

    ReplyDelete
  110. @Malik, and 26/11/26: I'm talking with our engineers about whether a change could be implemented on our side (i.e., adding a crossdomain.xml file to Blogger to enable this); there is no work-around (as far as I know) at this time.

    ReplyDelete
  111. So in this process - was I supposed to use the migration tool first? I followed the directions listed here, but it isn't working. I get a message "The DNS record for your domain is not set up correctly yet." Now I am worried that I was supposed to use the migration tool first. Of course, now I don't have that option, as I already changed the Publishing settings, and now it won't let me switch back to publish by ftp so that I can run the migration tool. This is BAD. At this point, I really want to back up and just use the migration tool so that I can get all the files on a blogspot url for now, but I don't have any way to do it now. Is there any hope? Please?

    ReplyDelete
  112. @websydaisy: If you intended to keep the URL the same (as indicated in this post, www.someurl.com) then you should have followed the directions here. If you were comfortable changing URLs, then the migration tool is what you wanted.

    If you need to reset your migration status, please file a ticket with the issue tracker:

    https://code.google.com/p/blogger-ftp-migration-tracker/issues/list

    ReplyDelete
  113. @Rick
    I should have specified, I am changing it from www.mydomain.com/blog to blog.mydomain.com - and it was not really clear what to do in that case. I set up a CNAME in GoDaddy for blog and pointed it to ghs.google.com - and by the way, on this page it says there needs to be a period at the end of ghs.google.com - but elsewhere in articles linked to from here and in the comments - it omits the period. Which is it? Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  114. @websydaisy: File a ticket to have your migration status reset and your publishing settings reverted to FTP; you should then use the migration tool. You should probably include the period, but some registrars don't require it. If in doubt, ask GoDaddy.

    ReplyDelete
  115. FYI, it started working at blog.mydomain.com so I cancelled my ticket to have the blog reset. My remaining question now - blog posts from before the change work at blog.mydomain.com, but the links to them (when you click on the name of the post) still go to www.mydomain.com/blog. I thought of setting up in the htaccess something to replace www.mydomain.com/blog with blog.varianjohnson.com, but I think that would cause issues with the files.mydomain.com I set up so that images would not be missing. Any ideas?

    ReplyDelete
  116. OK I'm still unsure of how to migrate. Currently I'm only using blogger so my whole content at both mydomain.com and www.mydomain.com. So do both the A record and the CNAME for www need to point to 'ghs.google.com.' (The trailing period is important.)?

    ReplyDelete
  117. @websydaisy: Links to old posts will result in visitors seeing the old posts for a few seconds, but they will be redirected (via meta refresh). Search engines will update their awareness of the proper location for the content, which will be at the new URL (blog.mydomain.com). You should be all done.

    @crescentman: CNAME for www, A Record should point at IP addresses, not a machine name. This is documented in the help article linked to from within the migration tool:

    http://www.google.com/support/blogger/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=55373

    ReplyDelete
  118. Hm, no refresh is happening for me.

    http://blog.varianjohnson.com/

    (The second post is at the old URL)

    ReplyDelete
  119. @websydaisy I suspect your template hard-codes the URL in, when it should be a template tag that Blogger populates with the current blog URL. If that doesn't do the trick, please file a ticket with the issue tracker:

    https://code.google.com/p/blogger-ftp-migration-tracker/issues/list

    and we'll look into it.

    ReplyDelete
  120. wordpress hint:
    i'm leaving blogger for self-hosted wordpress, and was able to import the posts into wordpress after changing the publishing method to blogspot (do that from settings - publishing). didn't need to use the migration tool for that. this way the current blog posts remain untouched (no redirection) while you get wordpress in order. best to hide the blogspot posts from search engines to mitigate duplicate content risk. do that from settings - basic.

    thanks for the good run over the years, both under pyra labs and google.

    ReplyDelete
  121. Thanks Rick

    Reference:-


    http://www.google.com/support/blogger/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=55373

    Our control panel disallows multiple A records. Which IP address should we default to?

    ReplyDelete
  122. @crescentman: All of them. 4 separate A records, one for each IP address.

    ReplyDelete
  123. @crescentman: Unfortunately, a naked domain will not work if your registrar does not allow multiple IP addresses associated with multiple A records. This is a DNS standard, and we do this to ensure that no one server becomes a point of failure. If you only point to one IP address, then you're likely to get failures when that one IP address is unavailable for any reason. You'll need to either change registrars, or opt for a domain that does not require a naked domain option (i.e., blog.yourdomain.com instead of (www.)yourdomain.com.

    ReplyDelete
  124. At this point I don't plan on making any new posts to current blogs posted on my own domain. However, in each case there are many other "regular" not blog pages on the domain. Am I right in assuming I can't move these blogs to a "Custom domain"? Also I know I wouldn't be able to add any new blog posts to these domains. Would I be able to edit portions or delete portions of a post or delete an entire specific blog post in the future?

    ReplyDelete
  125. i post via livewriter from microsift to a blogger doamin. do i need to change anything?

    ReplyDelete
  126. Rick: Any news on a means of outputting the blog file for a user to download? My old set-up used to produce a single php file that it uploaded to my server. If I can simply create that file and save it, it gives me a stepping stone towards finding an alternative system.

    (I was half way towards setting up Wordpress when other projects meant that I couldn't spend enough time finishing the job.)

    Many thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  127. wow.. what a pain.

    when you save the new settings for "files host" does blogger republish all the files to the new subdomain ( which I had to create because my blog was at mysite.com/blog/, now blog.mysite.com ) ???

    just curious as to how it works.

    ReplyDelete
  128. @Nick: Content that's on the custom domain will be exclusively the blog content (i.e., pages/posts created by us). If you have other files (HTML or otherwise) that are not managed by Blogger they will need to live on a different URL. If you aren't making new posts, you can leave the blog as is - but you will not be able to update those posts (as doing so would require us to have some way of publishing the updated content, and we will not support FTP after 5/1).

    @Thomas: No, you don't need to change anything.

    @Kiell: No, Blogger-hosted blogs do not output PHP files.

    ReplyDelete
  129. I have a Blogger blog as a component of my site and it lives on my own domain eg. www.mysite.com/blog. After the May 1st date arrives, will the export to Wordpress functionality (in Wordpress) work to bring content into Wordpress? Or must I initiate the import before May 1st or risk not being able to complete the import?

    ReplyDelete
  130. @B: You will always be able to export your blog from within the Blogger dashboard.

    ReplyDelete
  131. Perhaps this isn't quite the forum for this, but I'd be interested in hearing alternatives to this new blogger setup. Its been quite frustrating - I really still don't understand the reasons for this change (to me I think it would have been simpler to change the method of communication between custom servers and blogger, not eliminate the service. But that ship has sailed.

    I'd be curious to hear what other users have done, if you're not following the steps here.


    Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  132. @mike: Suggest you have that conversation on the forums, perhaps in the "coffee talk" forum.

    ReplyDelete
  133. Rick

    Do I just follow the instructions above for preserving my url and ignore the migration tool in the FTP Migration Dashboard?

    Rena

    ReplyDelete
  134. @Rena: If you intend to do what's described in this post, yes.

    ReplyDelete
  135. @Rick, I know it's 11th hour time now, but how quickly can we expect to get a response on the issue tracker site? I'm having an image problem, and I imagine it's similar to what yaromir described having above. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  136. @Dingo: The team is reviewing issues each day throughout the day. You should hear back within 24 hours, but usually much quicker. I'm meeting with them today to ensure that we respond quickly to any last minute issues that come up.

    ReplyDelete
  137. I posted a comment yesterday but since I have not seen it here yet I will try again.

    I have zero experience in these things.

    What will happen if I don't complete the change over by 1 May? Will I still be able to do it later?

    I have two sites that have their own domain names:

    One is www.xxx.com and the other is www.yyy.com/ccc.html.

    Is the second one a subdomain?

    Are they treated identically in this process or not?

    What is a native domain?

    I pressed the button to back up the blog and got a file with the @ sign deposited on my desk top. My Mac said it couldn't open it. Should I do anything or just go on?

    Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
  138. @Harold:

    What will happen if I don't complete the change over by 1 May? Will I still be able to do it later?

    You will no longer be able to automatically migrate, though you will still be able to do so manually. We will have a post up later today about this.

    I have two sites that have their own domain names:

    One is www.xxx.com and the other is www.yyy.com/ccc.html.

    Is the second one a subdomain?


    No, the second one is a file on the yyy.com domain.

    Are they treated identically in this process or not?

    Yes, they are treated the same. Both are eligible to be moved to a Blogger-hosted domain; in the case of yyy.com/ccc.html, however, the filename will change as Blogger uses standard naming conventions for its hosted pages (which is not configurable).

    What is a native domain?

    Not sure what you're referring to.

    I pressed the button to back up the blog and got a file with the @ sign deposited on my desk top. My Mac said it couldn't open it. Should I do anything or just go on?

    This is a backup file in a format that Blogger can use to restore your blog if you ever need to do so. It is not intended to be opened on your Mac.

    ReplyDelete
  139. Okay, so I changed to a custom domain setting on Blogger and tried to add a CNAME (using cPanel) and get the error: "blog.puzzalot.com. already has a A record.
    You may not mix CNAME records with other records for the same name."

    Do I need to delete the A Record before I can add the CNAME? Or am I messing something up?

    ReplyDelete
  140. @Skott: You'll need to talk with your registrar. That should not be an A Record, it should be a CNAME.

    ReplyDelete
  141. Hi Rick,

    I was wondering how you can tell if you've migrated? I've changed my CNAME to ghs.google.com. and A records to 74.125.93.12 and everything appears to be working. However when I go to blogger.com I still get the migration notification.

    Cheers

    ReplyDelete
  142. @LoGiCane If you visit your old blog URL and can see the "this blog has moved" post, and/or you see the rel=canonical code in the HTML of your blog, you're all set. You can ignore the migration alert - in a couple days it will be something you can dismiss.

    ReplyDelete
  143. Rick, can I just move my blog to a new domain, one I've had parked? I am not going to mess up my main website for google. I will move the blog to the new domain, if that's not possible, then I will probably migrate to wordpress or something. I am not happy w/ all this; yes, I know, google doesn't really care.

    ReplyDelete
  144. @sturmkatze You can either migrate the blog using the migration tool we built, or you can update the publishing settings in Blogger directly (which will not result in traffic redirecting from your old blog to the new).

    ReplyDelete
  145. how do we remove that stupid blogger bar? That's not going to fly.

    ReplyDelete
  146. Documented in the FAQ. Use CSS to set the display to 'none' for the navbar div.

    ReplyDelete
  147. So I transferred my stuff over but it looks like the CSS files and everything are timing out when trying to load. Sometimes it loads, sometimes it doesn't. Any suggestions?

    ReplyDelete
  148. @John: Please file a ticket with the issue tracker to track any specific issues related to your migration.

    ReplyDelete
  149. @Rick
    Issue tracker has grayed out the "submit issue". I would have migrated a long time ago but my developer just didn't get finished in time...

    ReplyDelete
  150. @John Not sure why you're seeing that, it's working fine for me. Navigate directly to new issue creation here:

    https://code.google.com/p/blogger-ftp-migration-tracker/issues/entry

    ReplyDelete
  151. Only NEW comments are showing up.
    OLD comments don't.

    ===> Could it be because migration tool didn't get to the end because FTP error?

    Old blog shows number of old comments but when you click it says nobody comment yet.

    New blog shows 0 comments for old comments, and number of comments for new comments

    blog is ok, just OLD comments are out.

    ReplyDelete
  152. @Claudio: Comments may take several hours to sync from the old location to the new, but they are not lost and they will appear.

    ReplyDelete
  153. Opened an issue but it was closed because 'things look fine'. While I agree that my blog appears to look ok, I still have a frequent "Unknown error 999", and images are either slow to load or don't load at all. I made my DNS/CNAME changes on Thursday, so I'd expect them to be propagated by now. URL is www.bradleysalmanac.com. Any advice?

    I should say, other than this issue, the migration was pretty smooth, using the "Advanced setup: moving from www to www" instructions. Well, except for my host charging me $50 for "advanced DNS control". But still, I expected worse. So thanks for that.

    ReplyDelete
  154. @Brad: We don't have widespread reports of users seeing "Error 999", so this suggests something that is unique to you/your location. I've let our engineers know about it in case they can do some more digging.

    Other than that, things on your end do appear to be in good shape: the missing files host is working, the blog loads quickly and is being served by Blogger.

    ReplyDelete
  155. Thanks, Rick. The response (especially on a Sunday... above an beyond) is appreciated. I'll also have a look on my provider's end.

    One more quick thing - I've lost my faveicon in the transition. Visitors will no longer see my customized faveicon.ico file, and my own has been replaced in my favorites/bookmarks with the generic Blogger 'B' icon. Any way I can fix this so it shows the one I designed?

    Many thanks,

    -Brad

    ReplyDelete
  156. @Brad: There's a good overview of pointing to your own favicon here.

    ReplyDelete
  157. Thanks, Rick. I tried that and it didn't seem to take, but I'll give it another shot.

    And, hopefully my last question:

    While everything seems to be working fine via 'www.bradleysalmanac.com', if you use just 'bradleysalmanac.com' (without 'www'), you are taken to my blog in a static state from last week, pre-migration. None of my new posts are Template changes are reflected there. Any advice?

    ReplyDelete
  158. @Brad: that's referred to as a naked domain, and to address that you'll need to follow the directions here (skip to "Create A Name Records...").

    ReplyDelete
  159. Just to let you know that the comments are OK now.
    Thank you for the support!

    blogdoleonardo.tapera.net

    ReplyDelete
  160. Rick: It seems I've dug myself a bigger hole. Images are no longer showing up on my site.

    My hosting companies settings are all worded differently from the instructions in the post you referred me to (http://www.google.com/support/blogger/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=55373). A name is not referenced, and the one place I think is the A NAME settings field does not have a place to enter all four IP addresses that are listed in that post.

    Example:
    ----------------------------------------
    Primary Domain: bradleysalmanac.com
    Points to IP: (? what to enter here? currently set to )

    NOTE: To route your web traffic to ReadyHosting, set this value to 65.254.231.122
    Primary domains (domain.com) can only be routed to a valid IP address.
    ---------------------------

    The instructions you directed me to tell me to 'point the naked domain to
    216.239.32.21
    216.239.34.21
    216.239.36.21
    216.239.38.21'

    How can I do this if there is only one place to enter an IP? I tried the first one, and now my site is not showing images at all, and my naked domain bradleysalmanac.com takes me to a google error page, as does my missing files url (files.bradleysalmanac.com)

    thanks,

    -Brad

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  161. @Brad: If your registrar prevents you from putting in all 4 IPs, then the naked domain will fail more often than it will work. I'd advise you to change registrars if you require the naked domain to work, or else force a redirect from where the naked domain was parked (to the non-naked domain, www.bradleysalmanac.com).

    As to images, I see images on your blog (resolving at files.bradleysalmanac.com). If you continue to experience problems, go ahead and file a ticket in the issue tracker so our support team can dive in.

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  162. I used the conversion tool, but all the links to the images point back to the original domain.com/blog/*.* locations. I can't use an .htaccess entry to forward all files if they aren't located in the new blogger hosting. How do I convert all the images from previous blogs to work in the converted setup?

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  163. @Two Maids: You need a missing files host, as described above and documented here.

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  164. @Rick Klau: I'll copy the files as requested. How will new images be handled in future posts?

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  165. @Two Maids: Please read the post; Missing Files Host does not involve copying any files, rather it's setting up a backup URL in the event that requests for images 404.

    Images in future posts that you upload through the post editor are stored by default in Picasa; if you choose, you can always upload the files elsewhere and just reference them in your posts.

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  166. @Rick: If I use files.domain.com then the files have to be present on that URL, right? I planned to use a blanket .htaccess entry for all the previous posts (over 600) so we don't lose our search engine placement. So I created files.domain.com and copied all the domain.com\blog\uploaded_images|*.* files into the same file structure on files.domain.com. When I enter files.domain.com to the missing files host block, it should work, correct?

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  167. Yes, that'll work (as long as the paths are the same).

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  168. I've completed these steps and everything works on "www". I clicked the feature to send http://blog.com to http://www.blog.com but it is not doing this. I tried pointing the domain to ghs.google.com. but in order to do this my host says it must point to an actual IP address. How do I accomplish what I'm trying to do?

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  169. @Malibeeje: Sounds like you're trying to get the 'naked domain' to work; you will want to follow the directions here (search for 'naked domain').

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  170. @Rick

    I am going from blog.mydomain.com (FTP) to blog.mydomain.com (custom domain). The naked mydomain.com is another website entirely, and it contains other non-blog subdomains. I am keeping all the blog files where they are, and I had the cname for blog.mydomain.com directed to ghs.google.com. DNS propagated fine, and my blog shows up as expected, without images, as expected.

    I am waiting for DNS propagation for file.mydomain.com pointed at my server's IP to go through so I can use it for a missing files host. However, I don't see how that's going to work. I won't have any files actually uploaded to file.mydomain.com, so how will file.mydomain.com/picture.jpg actually pull up the file located at blog.mydomain.com/picture.jpg? How would it know not to pull up, say, www.mydomain.com/picture.jpg, or website.mydomain.com/picture.jpg? It doesn't make sense. Will a missing files host in my situation actually work, since my blog subdomain is not synonymous with the naked domain?

    I'd appreciate some help! Thanks :)

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  171. @Betsy: what happens is that file.mydomain.com becomes a clone of the URLs that were previously at blog.mydomain.com. So when an image is requested at blog.mydomain.com, Blogger will recognize it doesn't have that file and will attempt to request the same file from file.mydomain.com- which will be aliased to the IP address that was previously hosting blog.mydomain.com. Make sense?

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  172. Sort of. But all the subdomains of mydomain.com have the same IP, so wouldn't file.mydomain.com be a clone of everysubdomain.mydomain.com, not just blog.mydomain.com?

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  173. @Betsy - it's easy enough to test; get an image URL that worked on the old FTP setup, and then try to access it by changing only the subdomain. If it works (it should) then you're all set. If not, you may want to talk to your webhost or domain registrar to make sure all the pieces are in place.

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  174. I have two blogs which, according to the notation on the dashboard, were Completed ( migration) before 1 May.

    One of them is fine.

    The other was fine up until a few days ago when it just disappeared from netspace. All I get is a 404 error message when I try to access it.

    Any suggestions?

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  175. @Harold: Please file a ticket with the Issue Tracker.

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  176. thanks, Rick. I did all that, I have files.mydomain.com pointed at my webhost's IP, and I still get broken links. I try to go to files.mydomain.com/picture.jpg, which is currently on blog.mydomain.com, but I get a 404 error. files.mydomain.com pings to my webhost's IP just fine. Am I actually supposed to re-upload all of my images to files.mydomain.com? I thought they could stay on blog.mydomain.com and the missing files host would take care of that?

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  177. @Harold: Please file a ticket with the Issue Tracker.

    Rick.

    How exactly do I do this? I Googled issue tracker + blogger migration but couldn't find anywhere to file a ticket. Probably I am not on the right site.

    Please advise.

    Thanks.

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  178. Scratch that. I figured it out. Turns out you have to copy the files from blog.mydomain.com to files.mydomain.com. You might want to mention that in your instructions...

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  179. @Harold: Details are in this post:

    http://blogger-ftp.blogspot.com/2010/03/new-process-for-reporting-issues.html

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  180. @Betsy You've actually set things up a bit differently, but it's going to work the way you've done it. Glad it's all set!

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